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590 shockwave 12 or 20 gauge?

Discussion in 'Mossberg 590 Shockwave' started by DTL, Nov 18, 2018.

  1. DTL

    DTL .410

    Messages:
    41
    Looking hard at the shockwave as a truck gun/home defense gun. I havent been able to shoot one since I dont know anyone who owns one and none of the ranges Ive checked with rent them. Im trying to decide between the 12 or 20 gauge based on handling. Is there a big difference in recoil between the 12 and 20 gauge shockwave? Would the 12 gauge be harder to handle under stress, duress etc? I currently only own 12 gauge shotguns and would like to not have to buy another size shell but if the shockwave in 12 gauge is too snappy for practicality purposes then I would consider the 20 gauge and start stocking up on 20 gauge shells.
  2. Djcala

    Djcala .30-06 Supporter

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    1,475
    I will say under stress/duress with endorphins and adrenaline raging you will have no idea weather its a 20 or a 12. As for range time thats different, each persons level of tolerance for recoil is different i also consider who else may be required to use it ?? 12 vs 20 at defense range i think difference in lethality is negligible. Recoil is surely more with 12 than 20 its physics but "more" may or may not be different enough for you to notice much. For me i prefer 20 for alot of shooting, but the HD shotty is a 12 , i have a daughtrr who finds the 12 intolerable but shoots 20 all afternoon. So basically ive not helped LOL enjoy the journey. Im sure others will chime in with that exact platform i know several on here own both and will give you a more definitve answer you seek.
  3. Ernst

    Ernst .410

    Messages:
    65
    In my opinion, there is nothing wrong with 12 gauge in a Shockwave. The birds head grip enhances your ability to control recoil and is totally different than a pistol grip option. Recoil is not an issue unless you're really recoil sensitive.

    The main issue with a Shockwave is practice, practice, practice. You can aim the weapon easily using a push-pull technique. You can also shoot from the hip; however, a majority of folks will typically shoot high and to the left. Again the issue is practice.

    Given you shoot 12 gauge already you probably understand the loads available (12 vs. 20). For home defense buckshot, number four or 00 is idea, depending on your surroundings. For a work gun, the load is totally dependent on the threat. I live and work around black bears, cougars, bobcats and coyotes daily. Our typical loadout is 00 buckshot and Brenneke Black Magic Magnum slugs. The 12 gauge Shockwave is an ideal work gun. We carry on tractors, in trucks, and on foot when working in the woods. Ours are modified with only a sling and Velcro shot cards holding extra rounds. Keep the weight to be minimum.

    There are several videos online demonstrating the use of shockwaves. Plus many on this forum can provide additional insights.

    Hope this is helpful. Regards
    DTL likes this.
  4. John A.

    John A. I'm "THAT" guy Staff Member Global Moderator Moderator

    Messages:
    13,402
    For me, truck gun, I would lean more toward 20. I'm getting older and more trouble with my joints and bones and I'm not able to get around as good as I used to do.

    And I'd also lean toward a 20 especially if there is a chance you would have to fire it from within the confines of a truck. less recoil, slightly less noise. Not needing the longest range or the most payload (pellets).

    If truck gun, you mean, you are regularly in and out of the truck a lot and need a gun you can sling over your shoulder because you have to worry about coyotes and big cats and bears and other threats you see along the way, I would lean toward the 12. You may get a little more effective distance with it and a little more power behind it. That's mainly due to a broader range of shells and wads and things you can make or buy with the 12.

    Sorry, that's clear as mud. But without knowing what your idea of a truck gun is, I can only give opinions based on presumptions.

    12 gauge, 20 gauge shells, they both cost about the same at the end of the day.
  5. 'mamma jamma'

    'mamma jamma' .22LR BANNED

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    14
    You will not notice it. Because in 20 gauge the firearm is a tad lighter. Now grant it if you go slug festing at the range in a 12 gauge you'll get a jolt. But these firearms are defensive tools first and foremost. You can blast all day at the range but be aware of your expectations. And being they are aluminum receivers they will not handle recoil better than Remington's Tac-14 with their metal billet receivers. Not trying to start war here, it's how that rolls.

    As the others have made note and it works with that argument about setting a high powered gun off in the house without hearing protection or muzzle flash outside at night messing with your vision, which means none of that crap matters when the adrenaline kicks in. Adrenaline protects the senses.

    But back to your concern, people who will have problems shooting these little blasters will be those who have own shotguns before.
    You cannot shoot these things like a shotgun.

    It's all about 'technique'.


    I've notice in my research many are just buying these like a fad or something, then tricking it all out and will probably never make the effort to learn the technique. Which is not an easy thing to do if you don't have place to do it at. You can find a range who will let you shoot a rifle easier than letting you shoot shotguns unless you belong to a private club.
    You have to pattern shotguns so you know what it will do with certain loads. I myself belong to a private gun club and we have to pattern on the rifle range at the 50 yard line and then move over to the shotgun range if we just want to blast around. If I didn't have those options I would never even consider getting one.



    I'm on the fence myself.
    I will say these firearms are some of the best tools in defense to come down the pike in decades. And all without dancing to a paperwork jig.
    And I do feel encourage when I see video's like the one below that maybe, just maybe I could handle these little blasters. Take a look at it to get the proper technique down.




    Good luck to you.
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2018
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  6. John A.

    John A. I'm "THAT" guy Staff Member Global Moderator Moderator

    Messages:
    13,402
    You wrote so much good stuff in the post above, I hate to not go into more detail, but I wanted to pull this sentence out and say something.

    While we are a Mossberg owners forum, none of us limit ourselves to only Mossberg and we all recognize the truth when it's told. Please don't feel obligated to not mention another brand. Or model. It's OK to do that. Seriously, you won't get flamed for it.

    Look through my posts. You'll read the words

    Remington
    Winchester
    H&R
    Ithaca
    Stevens
    Turkish shotguns
    NEF
    FN

    And many others.
  7. Elbert Garrett

    Elbert Garrett 20g Supporter

    Messages:
    738
    The SW 12 will allow you more options as far as after market accessories and ammo choice...as far as recoil, there are alot of low recoil shells available. Good luck with your choice!
    John A. likes this.
  8. Ernst

    Ernst .410

    Messages:
    65
    Couple of facts

    A Tac 14 weighs 5.65 lbs empty and holds 4 plus 1 rounds

    A Shockwave weighs 5.25 lbs empty and holds 5 plus 1 rounds

    You judge the recoil difference for yourself

    Regards
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2018
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  9. Elbert Garrett

    Elbert Garrett 20g Supporter

    Messages:
    738
    I just checked my SW, in it`s current configuration and loaded it`s 6.5lbs......
    John A. and Ernst like this.
  10. Scoop

    Scoop .30-06

    Messages:
    1,549
    There is a bunch of good stuff in mamma' post above.

    I know post this is sort of off-topic and general, but I would like to expand on the sensory affects w/ regards to indoor shooting. It is NOT like the movies where the cop partners go into a building and fire a dozen shots off and then whisper their next tactical moves to each other. There is temporary deafness. In practice shooting w/out ear protection you almost hate to pull the trigger again because it really painful. In real life tactical shooting that may differ.

    The one thing I would like to see for practice or training would be a way to simulate an adrenaline dump safely. Individuals react differently to stress initiated adrenaline reaction. Eyes, ears, nerves, bowel, bladders and muscles behave differently in different people. I've interviewed several soldiers for detailed descriptions and they report a variance and yet they share some commonalities.

    In my case the most noticeable effect is on my sight. I get tunnel vision and lose chromatic awareness... everything is reduced to shades of grey and peripheral vision is nil. Your mileage may vary.
    John A. likes this.
  11. John A.

    John A. I'm "THAT" guy Staff Member Global Moderator Moderator

    Messages:
    13,402
    Thank you for replying scoop.

    I wanted to let you know that my vision has changed with high dumps of adrenaline. Tunnel vision is the best way for me to explain it. It's a period of time when the body is on auto pilot.

    I have never had to experience shooting someone thankfully, but one of my prior jobs that I have done in my life, was as a lineman. There was one time where an insulator broke and one leg of the transmission line fell as I was climbing the pole. The only thing that saved my life (other than God wasn't ready for me at the moment) was the fact that the power line drooped down over the CATV and Phone, which created a dead ground and blew the fuse further up the road from my location, thus cutting the power. That was the worst day I ever had at work and the nearest that I ever came to leaving this place. All I saw was a bright purplish white flash and the sound I heard. I tasted copper (ozone) for days. Nothing tasted right.

    I do know what you are referring to. And it's not something that turns off as quickly as it turns on either. It can actually take DAYS to feel more like yourself before the adrenaline dump occurred.
    Scoop likes this.
  12. ricky_bobby

    ricky_bobby .22LR

    Messages:
    18
    Best post about a Shockwave weapon IMO - keep it simple - sling and extra rounds - all these guys adding arm braces, full rails, etc etc, all just adding weight and taking away what the weapon is - an extremely small, compact, light, defense package -

    If you're going to spend the money on an arm brace for the "Firearm", you would be much better off to ATF Form it and make an SBS - the arm brace kits are around $150-200 which is the cost of the stamp. And it leaves your hand in place to easily operate the safety, on the Mossbergs.
    John A. likes this.
  13. John A.

    John A. I'm "THAT" guy Staff Member Global Moderator Moderator

    Messages:
    13,402
    ^ Been saying this for a long time now. But I realize that many people don't want the headache and hassle dealing with the government.
    ricky_bobby likes this.
  14. Elbert Garrett

    Elbert Garrett 20g Supporter

    Messages:
    738
    Picked up a SB brace for 99$ from Primary Arms and added a magpul fore grip and she weights 6.5 lbs loaded with a caddy so I only picked 1.25 lbs....no regrets!

    102_9510.JPG
  15. ricky_bobby

    ricky_bobby .22LR

    Messages:
    18
    Looks great - If I was going to brace it I probably would do so on the Remington Tac14 or V3 Semi because of safety location - but if you train for it a PG can work nicely on the Moss - great looking setup, glad to see you got the side card with 4 more rounds on there! Mrgunsngear on Youtube did the same SBM4 brace kit and he slung it up with some 550 cord I believe -

    The new SBA3 brace is also "the tits" being adjustable -
    Elbert Garrett likes this.

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