First Aid Kits

Discussion in 'Survival' started by 3skulls, Mar 14, 2014.

  1. Elucase

    Elucase 20g

    Messages:
    522
    What about training? The Red Cross offers some good classes on first aid, CPR, artificial respiration, etc.
    SHubbell likes this.
  2. 3skulls

    3skulls .223

    Messages:
    397
    Yep corn starch works pretty good on nails. Also if you can get them to calm down. So many dogs hate nail trims and gets their heart rate up.
    We do have the powder for them.
    Nicks on a dogs ear are good bleeders as well.


    I wouldn't mind taking a couple of classes. That's something to look into for sure.
  3. GunnyGene

    GunnyGene Racist old man

    Messages:
    4,063

    This is the one you'll want to get (there are several different ones) http://www.maxpedition.com/store/pc/Pocket-Ref-by-Thomas-J-Glover-p754.htm . Maxpedition also has many other items you might find useful such as firstaid pouches, shell holders, etc.
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2014
  4. SHubbell

    SHubbell .22LR

    Messages:
    14
    Sorry for reviving an old thread...
    But, regular superglue is fine for minor wounds and cheaper than "medical" super glue. The only difference is that medical glue does not sting.
    Quick clot should be used for bleeding wounds that are otherwise not stopped by other conventional means or there is going to be a long transfer time.
    I have several load outs for various excursions. From boo boo kits up to field surgery kits.
    Djcala and John A. like this.
  5. RichardL

    RichardL .410

    Messages:
    93
    Make that "some plastics are hygro"....not "plastics are hygro". Common pill bottles like polypro and polysty are NOT hygro. And as to hygro being a problem, it depends on what you plan to store and for how many decades. You don't tend to plan to store meds in a first aid kit for twenty years nor do you have any probs in the intended lifespan of a medicine packed in one.

    Common pill bottles, in all sizes, are all perfect for first aid kit storage of meds. They are NON-hygroscopic.
    SHubbell likes this.
  6. SHubbell

    SHubbell .22LR

    Messages:
    14
    This is my wheel house. So...I am pretty sure I can give you some good ideas on what to pack for a range bag, IFAK kit....just ask. Here to help.
  7. Scoop

    Scoop .308

    Messages:
    1,035
    @SHubbell , it's good to have you and your wheelhouse with us.
    Our shooting club has first aid kits available at the club house and we have some in the Sheriff squads when we are teaching at the range.

    Could you give us a briefing on quick-coag products: brands, types, cost, shelf life, etc. These are things I'd like to know if I make suggestions in this field. Right now I'm ignorant, but I'm eager to hear advice from those w/ practical experience.
    [​IMG]
    edit: change anti-coag to quick-coagulant [obviously]
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2017
  8. SHubbell

    SHubbell .22LR

    Messages:
    14
    Thank you and absolutely. I am OOT today, so, tomorrow I will get you some links when I have my regular computer.
    Scoop likes this.
  9. SHubbell

    SHubbell .22LR

    Messages:
    14
    If you have some grant money, donations or seized funds, there are some really great pre-packaged kits for public areas (which actually kind of sucks if you think about it) just like AED's. It is the same gear I carry, most LEO's carry and the military carry. Just different colors. Normally I would not recommend pre-packaged kits, but these are top quality and designed for penetrating wounds. You can also become an instructor on it in a couple of hours as these are not only designed for medical personnel but also the lay person.
    This link is for the active shooter, mass casualty kit. It will give you an idea.

    https://www.narescue.com/public-access-bleeding-control-stations-8-pack-nylon

    That is the sight I know of. There may be others that have different pricing. It is a good starting point though.

    The kits are vacuumed sealed and the most recent one I saw was "good" until 2021.

    I am in no way affiliated with this company or any of the gear. I have just used all of it in real life situations and know that it works. All of the individual pieces are available on Amazon or other vendors as well.
    Scoop likes this.
  10. Djcala

    Djcala 20g Supporter

    Messages:
    721
    This is very important topic that deserved reviving. It should be important to all and definetly those who share our common hobby. As soon as i read it i went and checked dates on my quick clot which i couldnt remember when i last checked. It DOES have a shelf life. The most important things in my range bag are TWO clotting agent envelopes, TWO gi wound dressings and a tourniquet. I am not a medical professional at all. I have been exposed to trauma caused by gunshots and had some immediate action training and have utilized it in real life. Seek out knowledge from skilled professionals it may save your or someone else's life. My sister happens to be a doctor and spent many years in an ER. I always pick her brain when I can. I know the clotting agents have come along way over last few years and do not know which is best. However, i currently have the Quickclot ACS it is supposed to be easier for the docs to clean out wound after its use than older versions and have less burn. Also, my limited and non proffesional knowledge is clotting agent on AFTER attempting to stop bleeding with direct pressure and dont use on an ouchy non life threatening wound its painful and makes a dang heckuva mess in wound if not needed. Thats my two cents worth of knowledge.
    Ps in teotwawki scenario most of your petshops carry versions typically for large birds which can bleed out quick if injured. And yes its gonna hurt ALOT.
    SHubbell and Scoop like this.
  11. SHubbell

    SHubbell .22LR

    Messages:
    14
    I carry QC Combat Gauze. It is vacuumed sealed and has a long shelf life. As long as there is no exposure to direct sunlight, most of the gear will work well beyond the shelf life in a SHTF situation. As Djcala said, QC has come a long way since its development. It is better and easier to clean from a wound. The powder type is a mess, but it will work. I think you can even get it at WalMart? And yes it is going to sting!
    The other pieces I carry in my IFAK are a couple of 3.25", 14 gauge needles for chest decompression and a 26 french nasal pharyngeal airway. All the things is this kit are easy to train on as typically it will be a part of your group that will be rendering aide to you. I use to teach TCCC and most of the people only have basic 1st aide and CPR training. Only takes a couple of hours to advance to the rest of the gear. As I said earlier, there are all sorts of Stop the Bleeding classes one can take and even become an instructor in. It is well worth the time and effort. Trauma shears are you friend. They are cheap and can go through leather with ease. Jeans are like paper. I will try to get a list and links put together sometime today for a complete IFAK.
  12. SHubbell

    SHubbell .22LR

    Messages:
    14
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2017
    DarkPassenger308 likes this.
  13. SHubbell

    SHubbell .22LR

    Messages:
    14
    A couple of other things to consider if you are deep wooding it, a cell phone booster and a charging unit. I haven't found a booster I have liked yet, so update me if you all have found one. I have been carrying the Pocket Juice charger for several years though and it works well. And it has a light. It appears we will be deployed to FL in the next few days, so it will for sure be going with me. It holds a charge for a loooooong time. I think mine is a Gen 1? Not sure. I can say if I haven't used it in quite some time, it still has enough juice to charge a phone easily.
  14. DarkPassenger308

    DarkPassenger308 .223 Supporter

    Messages:
    165
    I've heard good things about the "BioLite" stove. It's a small stove that has a Peltier device in it (uses dissimilar metals and a heat differential to generate electricity. Black magic physics.)

    Throw sticks and twigs or anything combustible into the stove. Make yourself some coffee or cook a meal. All the while, it's trickle charging a battery pack. You can then use that battery to charge anything you need via USB port.

    You have endless charging potential, so long as you have access to combustible materials.

    I'm going to bring one with me on my next trip into the deep Alaska bush. Charging my GPS while cooking a grouse? Win-win.

    Good luck in FL, and thank you for your service.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  15. SHubbell

    SHubbell .22LR

    Messages:
    14
    Thank you.

    I will look into the BioLite!!
  16. SHubbell

    SHubbell .22LR

    Messages:
    14
    We have been stood down for now going to FL. So I hope that is a good thing....
    DarkPassenger308 likes this.

Share This Page