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Discussion in 'Work Safe' started by meanstreak, May 10, 2017.

  1. Bobster

    Bobster .30-06 Supporter

    Messages:
    2,614
    DC TIG is very similar to O/A welding. Instead of a flame, you have an arc that acts like an adjustable flame (sort of ;) ). If you get too close with the flame, it will pop--same with the W. If you hold the flame in one area too long, it will melt through.

    My suggestion would be to get to know the machine without the pulse first. You learn to do the pulsing with your foot. "Accelerate" on the pedal, get a puddle going, back off if you need to, add a little filler to the puddle, decel but don't extinguish, move the torch, repeat. Pay attention to the color of the hot steel and the "wetness" and back off the pedal if necessary to keep it from drooping out on you. Adding filler can cool the weld, also.

    Turn the piece over when done and look at your HAZ--it should be a uniform distance away from the weld. If it got wider as you went along you were putting too much heat into the work and will need to adjust your speed and/or heat.

    It is hard for me to evaluate your work because it appears you took it to the wire wheel. ;)

    PS: learn to get good with steel before you move to aluminium. Al doesn't change color with heat like Fe does and you need to be more aware of the "wetting" or the point where metal changes state from a solid to a liquid...

    PPS: when welding over a void like the pinhole pic, make sure the Ar is turned up a little to help push the atmosphere out of the void. 25cfm is a good start.
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2021
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  2. CaddmannQ

    CaddmannQ 12g Supporter

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    I had some things going against me today. On top of inexperience that is.

    I was outdoors welding with curtains, and so I had the Argon up a lot.

    I didn’t really clean the metal enough before I started, because I wasn’t trying to get a presentation weld but just figure out basic heat settings.

    A number 10 welding lens is just too dark for this business. I’ll have to get something a bit lighter.

    I was getting a bit of glare from behind me because the curtain back to me was not dark enough to cut the light. I wound up welding with a dish towel over the back of my head. NFG

    Considering how much trouble I had seeing the weld, I’m surprised things turned out this good.
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  3. Rodburner

    Rodburner .270 WIN

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    I hear you. My helmet is adjustable from 9 to 13, but I wear my reading glasses underneath, which makes my eyes work twice as hard. Luckily it’s one of those big window helmets so I can usually contort my head to block light coming from behind, while still seeing the puddle. I also have an old patio umbrella that mounts to the cart, which helps a lot.
  4. CaddmannQ

    CaddmannQ 12g Supporter

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    9,443
    I intend to do most of my welding indoors. I will have a lot more control of the light.

    Anyhow I think I might buy an auto darkening helmet for non-pulse welding.
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  5. CaddmannQ

    CaddmannQ 12g Supporter

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    9,443
    I took a chisel to those welds I made and tried to knock them apart but it was not possible.

    The weld metal is almost as tough as my chisel.

    I took those straps welded together and tried to peel them apart. The straps broke first in every case, so based on this I think I’m prepared to start putting some sheet metal on the VW.

    First, I have a few more things to straighten out with the fiberglass body before I can continue with the frame, but that will definitely come.
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  6. CaddmannQ

    CaddmannQ 12g Supporter

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    9,443
    I torched my checking account and bought an expensive automatic helmet. Over $300 compared to $45 for my Jackson.
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  7. fellmann

    fellmann Esoteric Supporter Premier Member

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    1,152
    Long time since i wrote in this thread :)

    I exist in limbo.. Nothing exciting happens... No new guns :mornin:

    Autumn is here.. A lot of orange leafs.. Grey.. Colder.. Darker..

    Take care...
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  8. CaddmannQ

    CaddmannQ 12g Supporter

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    9,443
    *yawn* almost tomorrow now…
    I swept out the garage this AM, went to Ace for more tape, & have been working on the kit Kar wiring ever since.

    The 6 front lights are wired back to the cockpit, plus the horn, & front main ground; and the front ground block is wired. Still working on brae switch and speedometer, gas gage and fuel pump. (Fiberglass cars get a lot of ground wires.)

    Soon the front end will be wired. That leaves the instrument panel, engine, and rear lamps.

    It’s taking a long time because I am being slightly picky about looming, connections being prepped and soldered, and everything being double shrink wrapped. So far everything is soldered, and there are no crimped connections which are not also tinned and soldered.

    I am also migrating all the wiring to the body, and divorcing it from the chassis completely. Then it will be easier to remove the body from the frame.

    Which I’m gonna be doing some day, because I’m not going to patch the frame or the floor yet. If I can get a title I am going to be happy.
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  9. Rodburner

    Rodburner .270 WIN

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    431
    Not envious of having to wire a whole car, at all. I will have to rewire my trailer project after this weekends modifications though. That’s one of the perks of autumn I like the best. Shorter days give me the sense that I worked all day on something and busted a**, when it’s really just a couple hours here and there between cups of coffee…lol
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  10. MikeD

    MikeD I'm Your Huckleberry Staff Member Global Moderator "Philanthropist"

    Messages:
    12,443
    Good Morning MO's!!!

    Made a quick trip up to MI's UP this weekend and dropped off materials to replace the roof on the garage at my cabin. Going with some GAF adhesive top cap as it us a very low slope roof. I plan on getting it done before winter which is only a few weeks away up there.

    The roof has been bad for a while. I've had a tarp over it for a few years. I was hoping to go until next year in the hopes wood prices would continue to drop but when putting a new tarp up a found some really soft spots, i.e. i stepped through, that probably would not support the amount of snow we get up there.

    I dont think it will be too bad of a job...but we shall see. Its only 25x15. Planning one day for tear off and 1-2 days to replace the deck and any other rotted wood. I will be there for a week with the family. Weather will be my biggest obstacle. I need a couple days without rain.

    Hoping to get a little hunting and 4 wheeling in as well.
  11. Rodburner

    Rodburner .270 WIN

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    431
    Spent the weekend modifying my little trailer and I think it came out pretty good so far. Narrowed the whole thing 12” and built a new tongue that’s a couple feet longer. Gonna build a new 8’ platform that will sit above the new 3w,4L deck that used to be 4x4.. lol the new tongue will allow for a full jackknife with a sheet(s) of something without hitting the car…glad I painted the welds yesterday, it was frosty this morning.. 5398DE34-EE5E-403F-AF36-7AADD6B0DF76.jpeg
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  12. Ernst

    Ernst .30-06 Supporter "Philanthropist"

    Messages:
    1,075
    Thought for the Day

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  13. fellmann

    fellmann Esoteric Supporter Premier Member

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    1,152
    I had to get me something "new" to play with :D Will post a "review" later for those who are interested :)

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  14. CaddmannQ

    CaddmannQ 12g Supporter

    Messages:
    9,443
    Good morning Mossberg Owners.

    I been busy on the car & I have finished all of the wiring forward of the cockpit, including the brake switch wires, fuel sender wires, installing the horn and its wires, plus a heavy ground connection for the front frame grounds.

    I also installed the brake master cylinder and steel brake lines loosely, and added new hoses for the remote Reservoir. I discovered the remote reservoir is damaged and I will have to order a new one.

    I had to weld up the worn out pedal hook and I used the new welder to do it.

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    It took me four times as long as it would have with the acetylene torch because I still don’t know what I’m doing, and I have never set up for 1/8” metal.
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    I stuck the electrode into the work at least four times and had to stop and re-grind it to do the stupid little fill. In the end it came out OK but not great.
    A1A31FCA-E6C3-4887-8FE4-1AAD1F20188C.jpeg Ultimately I’m going to get rid of the Volkswagen pedal system or at least modify it. This will keep it together long enough.

    When I said that I “installed the master cylinder”, what I did is put a big bolt clear through the frame and bolt it in with steel angles temporarily, because the original master cylinder mounting was rusted & I chiseled it away about two months ago.

    So I straightened out the bent pedals, got the pedal assembly cleaned up, and installed it with new pedal rubbers. I cleaned up the extended brake pushrod and got that installed as well.

    I installed some longer hoses for the remote brake reservoir so it would be easy to fill the fluid and increase the system capacity. Unfortunately I discovered damage at the top of the reservoir and I will have to order a new one. For now I can get some fluid into the system and bleed it and lock everything down, and then I will be ready to use the brakes.
    _________________
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  15. MikeD

    MikeD I'm Your Huckleberry Staff Member Global Moderator "Philanthropist"

    Messages:
    12,443
    I've not been posting much lately but have been enjoying catching up on @CaddmannQ's welding posts. Thats a something I've allways wanted to do but one of the few things I have not had a chance to dabble with. Thanks!
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  16. Rodburner

    Rodburner .270 WIN

    Messages:
    431
    Quick question for experienced utility trailer tower’s..will be building a new platform to haul sheet goods,4x8’, very occasionally. I’m thinking just a single run down the middle with suitable bolsters, and hauling the sheets upright, on their long sides. The other option is to make an adjustable double run and lay the sheets flat. I’m not going cross country here, Lowe’s is a 5 smooth miles round trip.lol I’ve towed travel and motorcycle trailers, so I’m probably overthinking this, but would appreciate some experienced input. A320E663-4D54-41D6-8631-61132AA0E41F.jpeg 30F72B06-E932-4D68-B01C-8414DA45C411.jpeg
  17. MikeD

    MikeD I'm Your Huckleberry Staff Member Global Moderator "Philanthropist"

    Messages:
    12,443
    @Rodburner Lay it flat!! The weight is more balanced, it will be easier to strap down and it will not catch as much wind (esp with such a small trailer)
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  18. Rodburner

    Rodburner .270 WIN

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    431
    Thanks Mike. I was leaning that way for sheets and the single for lumber, since I can use the same parts for both. Nothing says cheap bastard more than a too sloppy to safely climb extension ladder and some 3/4” gas pipe..lol 7A65E09C-962B-4B59-AF60-8386F19A81CD.png
  19. Bobster

    Bobster .30-06 Supporter

    Messages:
    2,614
    What Mike D. said--lay it flat. Take a ratcheting tie-down and hook from rail to rail then tie the "extra" strap so it doesn't flap in the breeze. Although it should be centered on the trailer, make sure the plywood will not hit your bumper when you turn.

    I have a HF 4'x8' "heavy-duty" version bought and assembled about 18yrs ago. Probably about 10,000mi on it. Tows easily behind a sedan no problem, probably used once every 1-2 months. I do not own a truck. I assembled mine so it doesn't fold/tilt and bolted everything together. I only replaced the 3/4" pressure-treated plywood deck with a new piece just last year.

    Got hit from behind at a stop light and although it bent the A-frame slightly, no damage was done to my car but it TOTALLED the 2006 Corolla that hit me: radiator, bumper, headlights, battery, hood, etc. I forgot to mention it was strategically reinforced front and rear.

    PS: I was looking at my trailer up in the air in my rearview thinking "WTF". ;)
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  20. Bobster

    Bobster .30-06 Supporter

    Messages:
    2,614
    A good rule of thumb is to set amps at the thickness of the metal in decimal. So 1/8" = .125" = 125A

    It looks like your parts got a little hotter than they should have but the welds look OK. Go buy yourself a cheapy drill press vise for $25 and use it to hold parts for welding and it will also act as a heat sink. Sample from Lowe's shown...

    Attached Files:

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