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590 Shockwave, 1st impressions

I don't understand the appeal of a 12 gauge set up like the shockwave.

I fire 2 3/4" and 3" loads with my full length, synthetic stock 590a1...I can aim and fire the shotgun, but I'd be lying if I said it wasn't somewhat uncomfortable, especially after more than a few rounds. I'm looking now to upgrade the stock (probably a mapgul) both to get a LOP better suited to me and to get a better recoil pad. Other than the ability to conceal and quickly maneuver the weapon, what's the appeal of a short stock shotgun like the shockwave. I'd much rather have a good stock to brace against my shoulder/chest, then have a little handgrip stock like what is on the shockwave.
 
Maybe if you could shoot one, you might like it.
It's not so much directed at the shockwave per se, but rather at shotguns in general that have that short type of hand grip stock.

It seems like those shotguns aren't as easy to get a good sight/bead picture on and they offer little to no mitigation on the recoil. I get that they are easy to maneuver, but still I don't understand why people prefer that style.
 
I don't understand the appeal of a 12 gauge set up like the shockwave.

I fire 2 3/4" and 3" loads with my full length, synthetic stock 590a1...I can aim and fire the shotgun, but I'd be lying if I said it wasn't somewhat uncomfortable, especially after more than a few rounds. I'm looking now to upgrade the stock (probably a mapgul) both to get a LOP better suited to me and to get a better recoil pad. Other than the ability to conceal and quickly maneuver the weapon, what's the appeal of a short stock shotgun like the shockwave. I'd much rather have a good stock to brace against my shoulder/chest, then have a little handgrip stock like what is on the shockwave.
Like many other things in life, one needs to actually try it before you actually know it isn't something you want. It may be the best or worst but the only way you will know is trying it out for yourself.
 

MarkB1

.270 WIN
Many reviewers say that the Raptor grip on the Shockwave is more comfortable to shoot with than the normal pistol grip. I find that this is true. Give the Shockwave a try, if you can, and you will see. Now a stocked 590 is better for longer range shots but the Shockwave excells for short range (20 to 30 yards or less) work. It'd easily maneuverable and gives you six rounds of 12ga. If you use the mini-shells you can get about nine rounds of effective shooting in the gun. Give it a go.
 

Rico

20g
Supporter
Fred425 quote on shooting a stock 590a1:
"I'd be lying if I said it wasn't somewhat uncomfortable, especially after more than a few rounds"
" I'd much rather have a good stock to brace against my shoulder/chest"
*******
To me, the Shockwave does not make shooting as uncomfortable as you stated. The birdshead grip is much more comfortable to shoot, and the recoil is absorbed more in your arms than in your shoulder. When firing a conventional shotgun, the shoulder is somewhat firm in its position, allowing recoil to "hurt" more. In shooting the Shockwave, the arms absorb/bend more reducing felt recoil. Granted, there is more of a learning curve with the Shockwave than a conventional shotgun. And, the birdshead is MUCH more comfortable than shooting a pistol grip 12 gauge. However, the Shockwave is not meant to replace the traditional areas of shotgun shooting.....bird hunting, clay pigeons, deer hunting, and self defense (for most). The Shockwave is just a dang cool weapon that I am very comfortable with. I hope you will shoot one and get back to us with your opinion.
 
Fred425 quote on shooting a stock 590a1:
"I'd be lying if I said it wasn't somewhat uncomfortable, especially after more than a few rounds"
" I'd much rather have a good stock to brace against my shoulder/chest"
*******
To me, the Shockwave does not make shooting as uncomfortable as you stated. The birdshead grip is much more comfortable to shoot, and the recoil is absorbed more in your arms than in your shoulder. When firing a conventional shotgun, the shoulder is somewhat firm in its position, allowing recoil to "hurt" more. In shooting the Shockwave, the arms absorb/bend more reducing felt recoil. Granted, there is more of a learning curve with the Shockwave than a conventional shotgun. And, the birdshead is MUCH more comfortable than shooting a pistol grip 12 gauge. However, the Shockwave is not meant to replace the traditional areas of shotgun shooting.....bird hunting, clay pigeons, deer hunting, and self defense (for most). The Shockwave is just a dang cool weapon that I am very comfortable with. I hope you will shoot one and get back to us with your opinion.

I suppose I'm a bit of a traditionalist when it comes to certain things. I like having my firearm (at least as it pertains to rifles and shotguns) shouldered and snug so as to mitigate recoil (as much as is feasible) and allow for a faster acquisition of my sight picture to take follow-up shots.

I'm not knocking the shockwave, I just wanted to know why some people like those types of shotguns. Thanks for the feedback.
 

Rico

20g
Supporter
This guy handles it pretty well. Fast forward to 2:27

This left me all grins. Thanks for a fun, and informative video shooting the Shockwave. This video should dispel any doubters. I'm glad he got it out of his drawer and showed us how to shoot it. Mines a keeper too. Bring us some more videos.
 
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Nick Burkhardt

.270 WIN
The Oregon State Police just instructed FFLs transferring a Shockwave to select Handgun when running background checks and designate them as Pump Pistol or PP on the 4473.

PumpPistol.jpg
 
This guy handles it pretty well. Fast forward to 2:27


Yeah he seems to have some skill with it. My point is that for quick follow-up shots at varying distances, I think a traditional stock on a pump action, or auto, makes sense. If you're looking for something that is easily concealed or stored, and want to be able to shoot from the hip, I think the shockwave makes sense; and in fact it seems that's what it was designed for.
 

Rico

20g
Supporter
Yeah he seems to have some skill with it. My point is that for quick follow-up shots at varying distances, I think a traditional stock on a pump action, or auto, makes sense. If you're looking for something that is easily concealed or stored, and want to be able to shoot from the hip, I think the shockwave makes sense; and in fact it seems that's what it was designed for.

Be careful about the law on carrying it concealed.
 

GT_80

.270 WIN
That's super cool! Too bad they're not legal in my annoying
Liberal state


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

MarkB1

.270 WIN
Get yourself some kind of glove for the slide hand if you're going to shoot this thing a lot. I fired mine 25 times in rapid succession and it was hot enough to soak deep into my gloves. I didn't feel like the reloads were done particularly fast either.

HEATSHIELD!! :)
 

MarkB1

.270 WIN
MarkB1, looks like the folks over in TX are getting ready for 1 Sept when Shockwaves are legal there. I noticed the below post on their TexasGunTalk site. I do not know the poster or anything about AimPro Tactical, but maybe they can help with your quest for a heatshield? See link below and scroll-down to post #210. Good luck!
https://www.texasguntalk.com/threads/the-14-mossberg-shotgun-that-isnt-nfa.61240/page-21


Thanks. I've checked with AimPro and they do have a heat shield for the Shockwave that is screwed into tapped holes in the mag tube ring base. The only problem is that they want $167.00 for it and you have to send them your barrel for installation that takes two or three weeks. That's a bit much for me.
 
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