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Could you spend the night outside?

Mudinyeri

Lurker
"Philanthropist"
It's a small chance, but there's always a possibility that a hunter could get turned around, disoriented or just plain-old lost and end up having to spend an unplanned night outside during a hunt. If you aren't prepared for it, there's a distinct chance that hypothermia could set in and possibly cause death. Tossing a few small items in your hunting pack could, literally, make the difference between life and death.

Here are a couple suggestions:

Heat Sheet Emergency Survival Blanket
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We're all familiar with the flimsy space blankets that you can buy for a couple bucks. For just a few bucks more, the Heat Sheet Survival Blanket is much more durable with only a very slight addition in weight. You might want to toss two of them in your pack - one for a ground sheet and one to wrap around you.

UCO Storm-proof Matches
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These matches are pretty amazing. I've dunked them in water to try to snuff out the flame and they've re-lit themselves! A fire to help you keep warm is critical and a way to start that fire is even more critical. These matches will light no matter what the weather. I keep mine, with one of the striker strips, in a waterproof container like the one pictured below.

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Hi-energy Food

Candy bars, power bars, whatever your choice, it's important to have something with you to help you maintain your energy. Personally, I'm a fan of Clif bars. Protein lasts longer than carbohydrates.

Water

Hopefully, you carry water with you when you hunt. Ensuring that you have enough to potentially last overnight is key.

What do you carry with you ... just in case?
 

Rossignol

The Original Sheriff
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Good topic. I'm all for a "just in case" pack. I also keep a machete, steel wool and 9 volt batteries. My whistle lanyards are braided para cord, theres something like 14' of 550 cord in each one. I always have water, usually a couple liters minimum, but I'm planning to get a hydration pack with a 3 liter resevoir as I have to carry water for my dog too, compass, whistles. I like a pvc rain poncho cuz it doubles as a tarp and it holds warmth in.

Where do you find those matches? The welding supply shop has the water proof canisters... unless you have another source for those to get the matches and everything in one place?

I bet these things would go nicely with a new Eberlestock pack!
 

Mudinyeri

Lurker
"Philanthropist"
Rossignol said:
... but I'm planning to get a hydration pack with a 3 liter resevoir ....

Where do you find those matches? The welding supply shop has the water proof canisters... unless you have another source for those to get the matches and everything in one place?

I bet these things would go nicely with a new Eberlestock pack!

The Mini Me and the X1 series of Eberlestock packs make great GHB's. The X1 comes with a built-in scabbard if you want a day pack that can tote your Mossberg. The scabbard tucks up into the pack when not in use and can be used to carry other long items like a camera tripod or trekking poles. Both packs are relatively inexpensive. The Mini Me is $99.00 and the X1 is $159.00.

I bought my matches on eBay. Just search on "UCO Stormproof Matches". My match containers came from Campmor.
 

Rossignol

The Original Sheriff
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I could def do the X1 in dry earth! I think we could add to this list a good pack as esential, even if its some sort of surplus pack.
 

sumoj275

Lurker
This is the truth. Depending on the weather and time of year my pack carries a lot of non-essintials that could become essential real quick. Fire starting material for sure, poncho, liner, extra hand and feet warmers, etc. Being prepared is better than dying!
 

Rossignol

The Original Sheriff
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sumoj275 said:
This is the truth. Depending on the weather and time of year my pack carries a lot of non-essintials that could become essential real quick. Fire starting material for sure, poncho, liner, extra hand and feet warmers, etc. Being prepared is better than dying!

Same here. I carry stuff that makes my wife look at me and ask what the heck I need all that for. It can be cumbersome. I also have one of Toby's Mudinyeri EDC kits which has been great to have and easily move around from truck to car and I have it with me at ball practices and games too.

But otherwise, yeah, I have and carry much more than I need on a daily basis.
 

Mudinyeri

Lurker
"Philanthropist"
I went on a hunting trip with a few buddies back in March. We all met up in the parking lot of a local church and circled the wagons to caravan down to Oklahoma. As we were going down the list of who brought what and making sure we didn't need anything, one of my buddies pulls a little Wal-Mart FAK out of his glove box and says, "I brought a FAK!" The FAK that I keep in my truck was handy so I pulled it out and in my best Australian accent replied, "That's not a FAK. This is a FAK." :lol: Suture kits, hemostats, medical shears, QuickClot ... we all got a chuckle out of my FAK.
 

Sn3aKyGuY

Lurker
I've yet to find a single 'kit' that has everything you need. I've pieced together my survival bag together over the last year or so. I get a lot of s**t from co-workers when I show up with my bag on my back but the other day I showed a few of them why I carry it. I'm a security guard and one of the accounts I'm regularly at was designed in a bowl pretty much. The parking lot is higher than the ground level of the building and when it rains hard the drainage sometimes backs up. Next thing you know we have 2-3 inches of water running through the building. One of my kit items is a full body rain suit. The coats, and I use the term coat lightly, are a joke. I have hoodies that are 1. more water resistant and 2. warmer than the winter coat we're issued and the wind breaker we're issued is little more than a light pvc-like jacket with a cotton liner.

So anyways, we start getting water in the building and we have to start putting up flood gates and sand bag. Needless to say we're starting to get soaked, so I run to my bag, throw on my rain suit and guess what. 2 hours later I'm dry and warm while the other two guards are setting their soaked to the bone for the rest of the night. Lesson of the night: you can never be to prepared.
 
I don't hunt, I just like guns....however, I'm sitting on my porch in Houston heat trying to get a good internet connection and I'm getting stung by ants...not sure there's much I can do about that. ;) But I'm all about keeping safe...like this post!
 

Rossignol

The Original Sheriff
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I agree, it is at best difficult to buy any single pack to meet all posssible needs.

Sn3aKy, my wife laughs at me for carryin stuff. In fact we had a ball game today, and I grabbed my bag, which includes Mud's (Mudinyeri) EDC Kit. She asked as always what I need it for. Truth is you don't need it until you need it. I keep first aid as well as some other useful stuff.
 
I know I need to add a few things to my pack, but quite honestly, I dont think I have hunted much out of sight of my vehicle in several years.
My phone has GPS, I carry a compass, and hunt familiar areas. I know anything can happen, but I just dont carry it.
 

Rossignol

The Original Sheriff
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The gps I would to add. There is a fairly simple one that alows you to mark a couple different positions. Tells you where you are and which way to go to get back to where you wanna be.
 
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