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Hunting 2021

MikeD

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. I like your wind chime. :)

I have Ryobi tools almost 20 years old now. The tools and batteries are on the heavy side so Milky-Dewey fanbois may not approve but the extra weight strengthens our wrists so we never have FTF from limp-wristing... :D Original batts are long recycled but the lions have been providing good service--I have some over 5yrs old.

My buddy made the wind chime, I just replace the cans once a year when they fade out. The alum bottles keep getting harder to find here.

I have a couple of the older Ryobi batts as well but they will no longer take a charge. Also started collecting Miwaukee, their circ saw is better than Ryobi's. I hate to admit that as I am pretty vested in Ryobi tools and batteries.

Also found out recently you can get adaptors to swap batts between most major brands.
 

MikeD

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Finished butchering up the doe this past weekend. Letting them sit in a cooler for a week gets the rigor out of the meat and really helps with tenderness and flavor of the meat.

Ground some more burger but canned a lot if it.

PXL_20220110_105917495.jpg

I did 12 quarts. Just diced meat, onion, garlic, salt and pepper.

Should make for some tasty and quick meals
 

John A.

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I put some roasts wrapped in butcher paper and then put in vaccum seal bags. I expect that I'll likely run out before any of it spoils.

But nothing wrong with canning meat either. You could probably eat it 3 or 4 years from now if you wanted to.
 

cmcdonald

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I put some roasts wrapped in butcher paper and then put in vaccum seal bags. I expect that I'll likely run out before any of it spoils.

But nothing wrong with canning meat either. You could probably eat it 3 or 4 years from now if you wanted to.
Wrapped like that you should be able to keep that in the freezer for at least 1 to 2 years no problem, probably longer. Steven Rinella even advocates for letting meat sit a year in the freezer before eating it, especially if it didn't get a chance to age much before freezing. It seems that some amount of tenderizing happens in the freezer. I pulled out a couple elk steaks that were easily over a year in the freezer, they were fantastic. Thawed in the fridge, then a little dry rub wrapped in plastic wrap for 12 hours or more, then on the BBQ...thing of beauty.

If you've never had elk, it can nearly have the texture of beef, just slightly grainier. Really mild, smooth flavor similar to beef. Next closest comparison would be bison...but bison can be nearly identical to beef.
 

John A.

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Elk is probably the most lean meat that I've ever eaten.

I like mine cooked on open flame the best.

Oh-m-gosh.
 

cmcdonald

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Another thing I've learned with wild game meat...pounding. A light pounding does wonders to break down some of the fibers and sinews. You don't need to beat the crap out of it and flatten it to make it quite tender. Pounding is a great alternative if you don't have time to let stuff marinate.

If I had a mature deer, moose or elk I'd be pounding most of it. The younger the better. That little 4 point whitetail my buddy took was really tender. Probably wasn't older than 2-3 years.
 

John A.

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It is true that young deer are more tender, and less gamey tasting as well.
 
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