• Check out the Hot Deals section of the Marketplace forum to order an official Mossbergowners.com hat.

I think I am liking a shotgun over a rifle, which is a big change for me

nitesite

Average Guy
Moderator
"Philanthropist"
Around my property we do have occasional predators. We rarely see any two-legged "accidental" visitors since out driveway is 900-feet long., but we do get our share of the four legged and winged variety.

For years I wanted rifles to suffice near every door and out in the barns. From .22LR to .308. And I found that I never had to commit to a necessary shot beyond 40-50 yards, because at that distance it just wasn't a threat to my home and livestock.

And the winged variety simply get encouraged to leave the area and not come back. It doesn't take them long to learn they are not welcome. Sky blasts work pretty well to chase them off.

So I am liking shotguns a whole lot these days.
 

John A.

Unconstitutional laws are not laws.
Staff member
Administrator
Global Moderator
And there is nothing in this world wrong with that.

It's been commonly said that a shotgun is probably the most versatile firearm of all time.

There is nothing on the North American continent that it can't deal with if used in the proper context.

I've gotten more and more away from rifles (specifically rifle calibers) in the last number and years.

For the record, when I go up on the hill, I've been carrying the old 500 12 gauge exclusively for the last year +.

It is loaded with buckshot, slug, buckshot, slug in that order and a side saddle holding a few birdshot for rattlers and copperheads.

The buckshot and slugs are for the cats and wolves and coyotes and 600 lb bears.
 

Ernst

Lurker
"Philanthropist"
The "shotgun" thing for me is the versatility of the ammo selection accommodating everything from clays to bears. Plus the ability to mix your load out in high threat environments.

The other thing, in my opinion, that drives selection of a weapon is the environment and surroundings where you live. Selecting a weapon for everyday 300 plus yard shots on a wide open ranch is totally different than living in the deep woods where 20 to 30 yards shots are common and brush and limbs tend to deflect cartridges. In recent years there has been a trend in embracing light weight, higher velocity, flat shooting cartridges. While these are great for wide open terrain they are not well suited to brush or the woods. Something as small as a .223 can be deflected by a blackberry bush.

Shotguns excell for under 100 yard shots and make excellent truck guns or home defense guns.

Regards
 

CaddmannQ

Lurker
I have 3 shotguns now (12 ga Mossy & two old 16’s,) but I don’t have a .410

Now John has got me thinking about the load out on my .45-70.

Snake, coyote, boar, bear, and then anything with antlers, in that order.

So maybe . . .

A #7 shot wax load
A #4 shot wax load
A #2 buckshot load
A 500 grn wad cutter
A 400 grain spitzer

Maybe I’m just overthinking this completely, but when you have the liberties to do so, that’s half the fun.

Shooting wax loads through a rifle barrel is not something I would do more than necessary. I am only thinking about self defense against predators and that once in a lifetime big game shot.
 
Last edited:

Ernst

Lurker
"Philanthropist"
Selection of a weapon certainly depends, in part, on the intended target ranging, for example, anywhere from squirrels to bears. That aside, I've always thought about the selection of a particular weapon simular to a bag of golf clubs. Each club has it's purpose and maximum effective range. You're certainly not going to select a 9 iron to hit off the tee on a par 5 hole nor would you use a driver instead of a pitching wedge to hit the green from 30 yards out. Having a range of weapons is, in my opinion, no different than carrying a full complement of clubs in your golf bag. Each weapon and caliber has it's own characteristics and limitations. Like in golf, knowing which one to select for the particular task at hand is where knowledge and lots of practice comes in.

Regards
 
Last edited:

CaddmannQ

Lurker
That’s kind of why I bought the long 16 gauge single shot. I think it would be cool to muzzle load it.

I’m not sure I would do it quite like that.
 

Jmm14534

Lurker
Premier Member
Good idea but this was obviously produced when you could buy 209 primers!
 
Last edited:

MikeD

I'm Your Huckleberry
Staff member
Global Moderator
"Philanthropist"
Good idea but this was obviously produced when you could buy 209 primers
I'm sure one can find a way to make it work with percission caps, musket caps or other types of primers with a little shade tree engineering
 

cmcdonald

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Supporter
"Philanthropist"
For the record, when I go up on the hill, I've been carrying the old 500 12 gauge exclusively for the last year +.

It is loaded with buckshot, slug, buckshot, slug in that order and a side saddle holding a few birdshot for rattlers and copperheads.

The buckshot and slugs are for the cats and wolves and coyotes and 600 lb bears.

I load mine exactly the same John. Buckshot first to hopefully deter a bear charge and followed by a slug in case he's determined. Followed by another buckshot, guessing that he'll be about on top of me at that point and I want as many pieces of lead entering his frame as possible!! And another slug and more buck well it'll be one heckuva story by then!! :lol:

Hard to beat a short barrel 12ga in the bush.
 

Ernst

Lurker
"Philanthropist"
You can buy little kits to mix up the chemicals and refill a used primer or even re-prime rimfires.

CaddmannQ, There is an old thread titled "Reloading Primer" in the Ammunition section of the forum that discusses renewing primers.

Regard
 

cmcdonald

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Supporter
"Philanthropist"
That's good practice and you're pretty fast too! Probably the most common mistake or technique to master is not short-shucking the slide during rapid fire...you did well!

If I practiced a lot more I could probably get close to that fast, my 870 is well broken in and my slide is quite buttery and assists these ol' broke shoulders of mine. I've shot a lot of clays with my pump both on the trap range and just goofing off in the field with hand throwers...I'm not too bad on quick follow up shots when needed. The good thing about hand throwing is the inconsistent direction of the clay which forces you to adjust quick or miss altogether. It's also great fun with a buddy or two.

I'm pretty confident that even under pressure I could get one or even two good solid hits on a moving target. Let's hope I never have to test that theory on a PO'd mama black bear or a grizz! :sniper:
 

MikeD

I'm Your Huckleberry
Staff member
Global Moderator
"Philanthropist"
Shooting clays is great practice. Once you get proficient try it from a low ready. I shot a LOT of skeet, some NRA Clays and a little trap as well as hand thrown clays when I was younger. Don't think about lead, just let it happen.

When I was really into it all I had was a 12g 870 so I loaded 7/8oz rounds to add to the challenge. It made me a much better wing shot as well as overall better shotgunner. To be good you have to develop good consistant form and the best way to do that is repetition.
 
Top