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Krylon, or Hi-Temp Grill Paint, or coated w/RIG?

nitesite

Average Guy
Moderator
"Philanthropist"
A blued barrel and magazine tube is gonna rust if it's going to be out in the environments often.

Would you use regular spray paint on them?

Rust-O-Lium paint for BBQ grills?

Just keep a coating of RIG (Rust Inhibiting Grease) ?

on the surfaces which might show some rust?
 

Ernst

.30-06
"Philanthropist"
Nitesite, I had good luck with Rust-Oleum Camouflage spray paint. I've painted several guns and it seems to wear well and protect the finish even in wet conditions. Comes in a variety of colors which if you want can be layered into any camo pattern you desire. As you know success is based on adequate prep and I've used spray brake cleaner to degrease the gun once any rust is removed.

Good luck!

Regards
 

nitesite

Average Guy
Moderator
"Philanthropist"
I think Cera-kote is extremely over-rated. Just ask my two duty pistols that wore thru that factory applied cera-crap in almost no time. Of course, they were duty guns but that coating lasted like NEVER.

I'm think I'm going with RIG and not spending any dollars on Cera-Kote or even Krylon. I mean, it's all just rattle can stuff anyway vs. long lasting grease.
 

Bathrobeman

.270 WIN
High heat spray paint works. It doesn’t have to be 1k degree header or grill paint. The not quite as high heat auto “intake manifold” spray paint works also and it’s offered in more colors.
The receiver on the shotgun is spray painted as is the barrel on the AR. They have a couple coats of matte clear on them as well. I believe I used wheel paint.
 

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MikeD

I'm Your Huckleberry
Staff member
Administrator
Global Moderator
"Philanthropist"
Cera-kote worked good for me but I only used it on hunting guns that do not see daily use.

Rattle can will only work if applied to a completely oil free/rust free surface. Otherwise it will still rust or peal off.

On my blued barrels I just keep them oiled and never put them away wet.
 

Bathrobeman

.270 WIN
Rattle can will only work if applied to a completely oil free/rust free surface. Otherwise it will still rust or peal off.
.
Wipe it down w non-acetone nail polish remover or the likes before spraying painting. My shotgun paint job is going on three years now. No peel, no flake. Sprayed right on top of the bluing. I’m trying to insert the link to the forum post where I painted it but it keeps showing up as a dude giving a peace sign.. Search Bathrobeman Everybody Get Black! http://www.mossbergowners.com/forum/index.php?threads/everybody-get-black.18236/
 

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John A.

Unconstitutional laws are not laws.
Staff member
Administrator
Global Moderator
I've used a lot of stuff over the years.

I agree that cerakote isn't as wonderful as many people seem to claim.

Norrells Moly is the best spray on finish I have dealt with. I've used it for more than a decade and for one example, this spring, I refinished an old mossberg with it after I cut the barrel down mainly to seal it off to oxygen and the elements.

It has hung on a nail in the barn (no air conditioning, no heat) just wide open outdoors of living in the south most of the spring, all of the summer and so far into the fall. Temp swings have so far went from 18*F to 103*F with about 3000% humidity.

There has been 1 spot of rust come up on it at the handguard nut. I put some motor oil on it and rubbed it with a rag and it came off and has yet to form back.

I carry it to the cabin and trail camera sometimes a couple of times a week. Enough so that the OD green camo spray paint is wearing off of the stock and you can see the tan stock color showing through underneath.

But the black moly paint on the barrel and receiver is still holding strong.

I abhor the aluma-hydeII from brownells. It's garbage. KG GunKote and Cerakote are both similar. Duracoat is pretty durable but takes a friggin' week to cure enough to touch it and put it back together. Plus it applies pretty thick so it's not going to do well on slides and frames. Spray paint does "OK". The good thing about it, it can be touched up whenever you need to without needing an airbrush and an oven.

I've done a lot of stuff, but blueing and parkerizing is probably the best, but norrells works the best from my experience. It's also very heat resistant. I use them on my gun silencers, which can get pretty warm.

As for cleaning old oil and solvents. Brake cleaner if you can put it on bare metal where you don't have to worry about plastics and lacquers melting. Otherwise, I use alcohol or acetone, depending on what I'm cleaning. It evaporates pretty quickly, and doesn't really leave a residue. But if you can heat the parts up for a while, you'd be surprised how much old oil and gunk can stay hidden in places you can't see or reach.
 

Bobster

.30-06
I use denatured alcohol (camp stove fuel) as a primary solvent because I believe it is the "safest" of the solvents and dries quickly with no residue and minimal vapors. I keep it handy in a Sure-shot sprayer. When the alcohol does work as a solvent (removing glue ink, or lables, for example) I'll try Brakleen red can which is a chlorinated solvent.

I worked in a boat building factory for a while as a mechanic/electrician. They would have greenhorns wipe the hull molds with acetone to get the release agent off. I have memories of their hands shaking as they smoked during break (ie: CNS issues). :(

A tip for using ANY solvent: do NOT put a dirty rag covering the opening and tilt the can to get the rag wet. In doing so, you are possibly contaminating the solvent with the crap from the rag.
 

MikeD

I'm Your Huckleberry
Staff member
Administrator
Global Moderator
"Philanthropist"
. But if you can heat the parts up for a while, you'd be surprised how much old oil and gunk can stay hidden in places you can't see or reach.

When I refinished my 835 I heated the barrel in the oven several times.

Funny, I recall I got into an argument over that with a member here when I originally posted my build thread. He said oil could not get unto the metal like that. My experience said otherwise. I degreased it thoroughly and each time I baked it more oil would appear.

While it may look smooth to the naked eye, there are many pores, crevaces etc. the oil can get into over time. Heating it will help bring it to the surface where the degreaser can remove it.
 

tcecil88

.30-06
Elite Member
I have painted several turkey guns over the years for me and other people. I used Testors Model paint and then Testors Dull coat over that. Granted they are not daily use guns, but 20 something years later they aren't rusty and very little wear.
 
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