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KY Constitutional Carry-moving to the house for a vote

John A.

Unconstitutional laws are not laws.
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It has passed out of the state senate and is now going to the house for a vote. I am hoping that it passes so KY can join the other states that have enacted this legislation.

But I am not getting my hopes up too high because I have been down this road before, and with this same topic.

So far, I have contacted all of Ky's reps and have a few responses so far. Mostly auto responses from a few of the democrat reps telling me that they received my email.

I did get a positive one this evening from Rep. Goforth, and he's not even "my" elected rep, but I appreciate him taking one minute out of his day to reply. So, I will do what I can to help him in the future.

I believe in our 2nd Amendment Rights. That’s why I filed HB30 to end gun free zones. I’m a supporter.

Sent from my iPhone
 

carbinemike

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"Philanthropist"
Good luck this time John. I'll tip my hat to you too as I know you are a long time letter writer.

At least some states are having the Constitutional Carry discussion. I have no hope at this time for Pennsylvania to join that group of states. Our only pro gun "success" would be beating down the annual "assault rifle" ban attempt and other "common sense" measures.
 

John A.

Unconstitutional laws are not laws.
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I write, call, basically make my voice heard.

It may sometimes fall on deaf ears with some, but they can't say that I didn't take 5 minutes to tell them about it.

I wish you could've read the email I wrote and the reply that I got from the FORMER state attorney general when they failed to defend the state constitution to the federal government. That was a scathing letter.

-----------
actual copy and paste of the email.

Jack Conway.

As the subject header explains, the reason why I am writing you this evening is to voice by disappointment in your decision not to defend the state constitution, in which you were elected to do.

Regardless of your personal opinions or leanings, you were elected to do a job.

I admit that I voted for you in the last election, but rest assured, that will be my last vote for your behalf coming from me, whether for AG, Governor or any other public office, including dog catcher.

Have a pleasant day
----------------

For the record, he was not re-elected.
 

John A.

Unconstitutional laws are not laws.
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UPDATE

Senate Bill 150 will now head to Governor Matt Bevin's desk after a 60-37 vote in the House. It allows Kentuckians 21 and older who can lawfully possess a firearm to be able to conceal it without a permit.

Gov. Bevin said Friday afternoon to Gray TV that he would sign the bill.

"It doesn't break new ground. It simply says that people do indeed have the right to keep and bear arms," said Gov Bevin. "... For those people who are offended at this idea and don't like it, there are other places in America where they could live."

more at link: https://www.wkyt.com/content/news/K...ry-bill-goes-to-governors-desk-506561551.html
 

John A.

Unconstitutional laws are not laws.
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@carbinemike the following may interest you.

Here's where KY stands and is either on the floor for a vote or has already passed.

This newspaper is certainly slanted left, but I am going to leave their headlines alone, despite that they said that KY WEAKENED gun safety, when in fact, they have actually strengthened it.

Here are more laws that have passed and awaiting the Governor to sign them into law.

More information and photos here:
https://www.courier-journal.com/sto...in-kentucky-general-assembly-2019/3033455002/

School safety
Senate Bill 1, Sen. Max Wise, R-Campbellsville. Sets goals for hiring more resource officers, counselors and mental health workers at schools; mandates suicide prevention training for teachers and staff; and establishes the statewide position of “school security marshal.” But it provides no money, only an intention to provide the money next year. Passed Senate and House, sent to Gov. Matt Bevin for his signature.

Weaken gun control *their words, not mine
Senate Bill 150, Sen. Brandon Smith, R-Hazard, would let Kentuckians carry concealed weapons without a permit or training or background check. Passed Senate and House.
[what they're not saying is that people can still obtain training and CCW licenses if they so desire--but let's not let facts get in the way of allowing the freedom of speech (lying).

Tax cuts
House Bill 354, Rep. Steven Rudy, R-Paducah. Would restore and expand exemption for sales of nonprofits of admission tickets including tickets to university sporting events. More than a simple fix of last year’s tax bill, it also adds tax breaks for several types of corporations and was amended Friday to restore policy of taxing only net gambling winnings rather than gross gambling winnings. Passed House and passed Senate budget committee, awaiting vote on Senate floor.
Private school tax break
House Bill 205, House Majority leader John “Bam” Carney, R-Campbellsville. Would offer tax credit to those who donate to groups that provide private school scholarships. Advocates say it would give at-risk kids access to education tailored to their needs, but opponents — including teachers’ unions — say it hurts public schools. Has been idle in committee for a month, but House leaders gave it a reading Friday — a step indicating it might move fast this week.
Borrowing to revamp parks
House Bill 268, Rep. Steven Rudy, would borrow $50 million to improve state parks – the first phase of a Bevin administration plan to ultimately borrow $150 million for parks improvements. Bill also includes a few other smaller new spending items. Passed House and is in Senate budget committee.
Sports betting
House Bill 175, Rep Adam Koenig, R-Erlanger, would legalize gambling on sporting events at racetracks, Kentucky Speedway, and on mobile apps. The bill cleared a House committee and a House floor vote has been delayed. But it has some powerful backers and remains alive.
Slash Grindle salary
House Bill 499, Rep. John “Bam” Carney, R-Campbellsville. Would roll back a raise of $215,000 that Bevin gave to Kentucky chief technology official Charles Grindle. That put Grindle’s annual salary at $375,000. The bill would put it at the highest salary paid to a state technology officer in a neighboring state – or about $210,000. Bill passed the House 99-0 and is now in the Senate.
Abortion
Senate Bill 9, Sen. Matt Castlen, R- Owensboro, would ban abortion once a fetal heartbeat is detected, usually around the sixth week of pregnancy. Passed the Senate, approved by House committee and awaiting a vote on the House floor.
Restrict open records
House Bill 387 Rep. Jason Petrie, R-Elkton. Would block out-of-state people from using Kentucky Open Records Law, allow no court appeal if legislative leaders refuse to release legislative records, and restrict access to public records in other ways. Passed House committee and is awaiting House floor vote.
Read more: Experts say Kentucky bill to block open records access 'really scary'
The Judge Shepherd Bypass
Senate Bill 2, Senate President Robert Stivers. Would allow state officials and agencies to get a special judge appointed rather than go to Franklin Circuit Court. Many Republicans are mad about Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd’s ruling striking down last year’s pension law — a ruling that was upheld in a 7-0 by the Kentucky Supreme Court. Passed Senate and is now before the House Judiciary Committee.
Solar bill
Senate Bill 100, Sen Brandon Smith, R-Hazard. A utility-backed priority to replace current “net metering” system. People who install solar panels in the future would not get the benefit of a current law where utilities credit them on a one-to-one basis for excess energy they generate for the electric grid, but would have their credit determined by the Public Service Commission. Passed Senate, amended by House it to make it friendlier to solar customers. Senate rejected House amendment. Awaiting House vote on whether to go back and accept the original Senate Bill.
Opinion: The original solar bill is right for Kentucky and its energy industry
Pension relief: Health departments and universities
House Bill 358, Rep. James Tipton, R-Taylorsville. Regional universities, public health departments, mental health centers and other quasi-government face a crushing increase in the pension contributions they must pay starting July 1. This bill, and others, would delay that increase one year. Critics warn the bill would cut anticipated funding for the troubled pension plan for state workers. Passed House and now in Senate.
 

meanstreak

.30-06
"Philanthropist"
Wow, a 215 thousand dollar raise. Holy shit. Looks like they are trying to take the public out public records as well.
 

John A.

Unconstitutional laws are not laws.
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Wow, a 215 thousand dollar raise. Holy shit. Looks like they are trying to take the public out public records as well.

Restrict open records
House Bill 387 Rep. Jason Petrie, R-Elkton. Would block out-of-state people from using Kentucky Open Records Law, allow no court appeal if legislative leaders refuse to release legislative records, and restrict access to public records in other ways. Passed House committee and is awaiting House floor vote.

======


Says it would block out of state requests for certain records.

This in response to the NYTimes (I think) trying to obtain CCW holders personal info to publish them. Would also help put the brakes on all these out of state non-profits interfering with what is done within our state.

It would not prohibit a state citizen from accessing anything that is public records. Just cut down on junk requests from people that it shouldn't matter to in the first place.
 

meanstreak

.30-06
"Philanthropist"
Ah, I misinterpreted what I read. It was the other part of it that I was not sure of, the part about legislative records.
 

MikeD

I'm Your Huckleberry
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"Philanthropist"
Hope this passes. KY is high on my list of places to move to. This would make the state even more desireable to me.
 

carbinemike

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"Philanthropist"
@John A. that is what I call some "progressive" state laws! They must be driving the bigger city liberals and their media peons crazy.
 

John A.

Unconstitutional laws are not laws.
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Yeah, there has been no shortage of political drama and entertainment since we had a Republican governor.

The democrat state attorney general has sued the governor numerous times.

Coincidentally, the state AG is also the former (democrat) governors son.

I wouldn't be too surprised if he doesn't throw his hat in the running for governor too. And no doubt, due to political contacts, would likely be the dem front runner for it.
 

meanstreak

.30-06
"Philanthropist"
It amazes me how many lawsuits are brought forth these days by the opposite side in almost all things political. The politicians have turned the government over to the courts.
 

John A.

Unconstitutional laws are not laws.
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Yeah, it's rare that once govt' gets into your business that they ever get out of it.

For many years, anyone could conceal carry. And this state has always allowed open carry.

Then one day back during the Clinton years I think, they voted in to have to pay a fee to the sheriff, to the state, and to an instructor, and then renewal fees for a what should've been a constitutional right all along, yesterday was a good day for us. It's over $200 to get your CCW here by the time you get everyone out of your pockets.

The CCW class was mostly stupid anyway. In a 6 or 8 hour course, the biggest thing they talked about was where you cannot carry (gov buildings, courthouses, school) and that you cannot use the gun unless you were in fear for your life, that's about the extent of it.

It shouldn't surprise anyone that once gov makes gun laws, it's stupid.

Reminds me of weekend before last. I took my youngest son to get his (state required) hunter education card. Another 8 hours of stupid stuff pissed away to satisfy a stupid requirement in the first place.

My son already knew every bit of it and has hunted with me for years, but this year he was required to have it.

Out of 50 question test following the instruction period he missed a grand total of 1. Then he had to go to the back yard of a church and fire a 22 rifle at about 15 feet at a target 5 times (got 5 of 5) and then to the shotgun area where he fired an 870 at 3 skeet (which he got 2 of 3) and it's mostly stupid.

I was exempt from taking it (born prior to the enact date of the law) yet I've had to set through the stupid class 3 times taking all of my kids because they're required to have it.

If they actually taught something that I hadn't already, it might would be different, but I have already done my job.

I did appreciate seeing 7 females (grown) all taking the course though. But their parents already taught them what they needed to know too, so it's just redundant.
 

CaddmannQ

.50 BMG
It's nice to see that things in Kentucky are still civilized. Well I mean except for that bear hunting problem.

But at least now you'll be prepared when that Bruin sneaks up, and you pull a big Smith & Wesson from your coat.

It is a big deal to get a CCW here but at least it is possible in this County, if you are not a known miscreant.

You have to have hours of training and hours of classroom and pay fees and submit forms and wait around.

Any gun that you want to carry must be on that form. And you have to test with it.

If you buy a new weapon later, you go through the whole process again and pay another fee, in addition to your standard FFL fees.
 
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