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Question Of The Month. (April 2020) (Virus Prep)

Discussion in 'Question of the Month' started by carbinemike, Apr 8, 2020.

  1. carbinemike

    carbinemike Global Moderator Staff Member Global Moderator "Philanthropist"

    Messages:
    6,079
    Howdy,
    This is a monthly series of questions topic for everyone to join in on the discussion. Some of the questions may have a poll, and some will not. Don't be shy now, go ahead and post an answer and vote in the polls...

    A month plus into the virus pandemic, what have you learned and how will you change being prepared in the future?
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  2. carbinemike

    carbinemike Global Moderator Staff Member Global Moderator "Philanthropist"

    Messages:
    6,079
    Sorry I have not been around and this QOTM is late. I was forced to work from home so I brought my PC and monitors etc. here. I took down my home PC to set things up. Would you believe that my work has M.O. (and all gun sites) black flagged? I have things set so I can switch back and forth now.

    I'll post more later but the first thing I learned was after I wore some steel toe shoes on day one that I hadn't worn in a while. That night my feet broke out in athletes foot and my can of Tinactin was 98% empty. All I could think was that if it was a more severe SHTF I'd be brought to my knees on day one with athletes foot.

    On the plus side, after Newtown I vowed to never be caught flat foooted agaiin for guns/ammo and I didn't have one urge to buy more of either.
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  3. Ernst

    Ernst .30-06 Supporter "Philanthropist"

    Messages:
    1,174
    Other than added anxiety regarding the rapid spread of this virus our life style hasn't really changed. We live in a rural setting on a farm and infrequently go to town for provisions or other supplies. Typically we'll make a trip once every three weeks or so. Yesterday was our first venture out in a month and we now have enough "stuff" for atleast five or six additional weeks of quarantine if necessary. If the weather will cooperate we'll have our garden planted in a few weeks. To wet to till yet. Our orchard is in bloom so spring is finally here. Our daily work routines haven't really changed. Blessing to be retired (if there is such a thing). Don't know how I ever found time to work a fulltime job!

    What has changed is the frequency of folks checking on each other. It's probably doubled or tripled over the last few weeks. Nothing more than a quick call, text, or email but it's important. Most of our friends were well prepared for this pandemic but if anyone needs anything or assistance with chores folks are willing to help. We have a few folks who are laid off from work so their life style has changed dramatically.

    One positive thing from my perspective is that we've had a real opportunity to access the adequacy of our preps. Important to have adequate food and water but maintaining adequate levels of fuel, firewood, medical supplies, ammunition, and spare parts is key. I'm sure many will stock up on masks and latex gloves once this is over.

    The reliance on this "just in time" logistics system and lack of "made in America" products is our greatest problem for the future in my opinion.

    Take care and stay healthy

    Regards
  4. CaddmannQ

    CaddmannQ 12g Supporter

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    9,572
    I've learned that my wife is totally under the media mind control.

    In the future I'm going to pay less attention to the media, and more to what I've always done.

    I like to cook, so I always have too much food around.
    I didn't have a single dust mask left though.
  5. cmcdonald

    cmcdonald Forum Moderator Staff Member Moderator Supporter "Philanthropist"

    Messages:
    1,713
    Definitely found that my preps were far from adequate. Not that we were in need or anything but just feeling the squeeze in reality has brought so much more home to me. Food insecurity may not be new to some here, and quite honestly I feel that those who know what it’s like to go without are FAR better off. That is not me and I feel less capable because of it.

    Being Scottish (I always blame my frugality on my ancestry...lol) I typically chafe at the idea having too much stuff just sitting idle. Which is quite opposed to my paranoia-lite that demands preparedness. So, a few observations and preps I will make when I can get ready access to supplies again. Hopefully it won’t be too late and we don’t go into a horrible and total economic collapse because of this.

    First off, I think biological threats and disease of our own excesses are far more likely to kill you than a bullet. Be those biological agents man-made or man initiated or whether Mother Nature decides to cull the human herd.

    So minimum will be re-usable half-face respirators and goggles for the family, likely something from either North or 3M. I’m considering a Mil-spec or CBRN full-face unit for myself as I’m likely to be at greatest risk of exposure. A good supply of respirator cartridges. Also, good quality re-usable HazMat suits, rubber gloves, rubber boots and a suitable mending material...likely a tape of some kind...duct tape? Lol...more research required.

    Disposable gear is helpful but not realistic for extended use or where/when supplies run out.

    More food and water preps. Never feels like enough.

    Can never have enough ammo. Whether for practice or for future. Both are important.

    I’d like to “harden” our place a bit more but have to consider cost and the likelihood of getting out of here in the next few years is pretty high.

    That’s about it for now. Our situation will change whether in a short time or a long time. And I will be able to make some more lasting plans. I’m hoping that we can have a long-term bug in plan and bug out plan. I feel we are not really ready for either at the moment. Partially due to the crappy logistics of our region and partly due to our family situation.

    I agree with Cadd, it’s tough having family members who rely on CNN and the gov’t to tell them the truth and they overlook the real truth smacking them in the face.

    I have to say I think my wife is slowly coming around. I think before all this she thought I was a lil tweeked...but she is starting to smell the coffee. This business over the mask flip-flop, while I was hollering at the tv over a month ago was startling to her I think. I think she’s started to realize that I’m not crazy and there’s something to this whole situation that’s not sitting well with her....from a gov’t/authority/media standpoint. I’m thankful for small steps...lol!!
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2020
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  6. meanstreak

    meanstreak .30-06 Supporter "Philanthropist"

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    4,305
    First of all, I think for the part we as a group are more thoughtful about being prepared than most folks. That being said I have learned things and learn more each day. I think the ideas that this group has is where I learn the most.

    We typically have enough food supplies to last us a month. That however is based on the freezer working. We have learned that a month goes by quickly and have had to come to the realization that more dry and canned goods are in order. Then of course water could become an issue.

    I have plenty of ammo, even a few calibers that I don't use. I could use it to barter if needed down the road. With what has happened to the financial being of the country that could be a possibility one day. As strong as the economy was it is also very fragile.

    I shudder to think what would happen if a natural disaster were to occur in the midst of this, and it will, it's the time of year for tornadoes and flooding. People all over the country are high strung as it is. Take away some gas stations and or grocery stores and things could change dramatically for the worse.

    I guess my point is, as much as one prepares, until things really get bad you just never know what all you need. One has to figure out what are wants and what are needs. The one unknown in this is how it is effecting people around you mentally. Mental toughness and character are in short supply in this country when times are good, and right now times are not good.

    Anyways, to the question of the month. I have learned that I need to really be more organized. Can't be thinking, oh crap where is this or that, or why didn't I think of that beforehand.

    Remember, this is not a test. This is real and I think it caught us completely off guard.
  7. Oddcaliber

    Oddcaliber .270 WIN

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    113
    My being a prepper/survivalist this is major inconvenience to me. Work hours have been cut to a 4 day week. Stores have different hours and I have to spend more time with the GF! LOL. Other than that I'm doing good.
  8. Ernst

    Ernst .30-06 Supporter "Philanthropist"

    Messages:
    1,174
    Excellent discussion and learning thread. I don't consider ourselves to be preppers or survivalists. However, I'd say we're realists! Just a few thoughts for your consideration.

    Getting everyone in your family on board is probably the best, but sometimes the hardest, issue. You can't go it alone unless you're a recluse living in the mountains and that's even questionable. Education and communication are key. If you have friends who are prepared talk to them. Ask questions. Read select books and articles. I do not advocate watching the doom and gloom survivalist porn on tv. They are always in a panic mode about something new and seem to live in constant fear of everything. All about ratings?

    One of the biggest decisions - do you maintain your current homestead (so called bugging in) or leave immediately or as the situation gets worst (bug out). I've always favored staying in place if possible. You know what you have, you know the surroundings, you know your neighbors, and frankly you can't take everything with you. Only evacuate the known if it's a dire situation. A few years ago we had to evacuate on very short notice for a major forest fire. Wasn't easy, especially not knowing for how long. I frankly don't see many good choices for longterm bugging out unless you have friends or relatives who permanently live somewhere else and, with their concurrence, you've prepositioned things you might need with them ahead of time. Don't show up uninvited! And remember, their house, their rules.

    Access the adequacy of your supplies based on whatever goal you set for yourself. After this last month, I doubt many will still agree with the government recommendation of 72 hours worth of stuff. Do you need a week, two weeks, a month or longer? Up to you and what you can afford. This current pandemic provides a perfect opportunity to do an assessment. Most importantly, make some notes. Document your shortfalls including shortfalls in your knowledge. Prioritize these shortfalls and implement a plan to address each one.

    Think from both a tactical and strategic point of view. Not just talking about homestead and family security. If this situation goes beyond a few months what are the things that must be considered now and start preparing for them today. For example, do you have medical supplies and the knowledge to use them if you can no longer access your doctor or your dentist? Today, the last place I want to visit is my doctor's office or a hospital!

    Keep some cash on hand! If the credit card machines and atms don't work plastic is worthless. Some advocate gold and silver. My only question - do you really think the local food market, gas station or farmer will take your gold or silver over someone elses twenty dollar bill? Small bills and coins are recognized by every one. However, down the road barter will become king. It will be a dynamic marketplace with folks trading many different things including labor. One thing I'd not advocate is trading ammo. May come back at you in the future.

    Hope you find these thoughts helpful and taken in the spirit they are being offered. We have been enjoying good times. Maybe somewhat less in the last couple of months but hard times loom on the horizon. Be prepared.

    Regards
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2020
  9. Bobster

    Bobster .30-06 Supporter

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    2,667
    We're not bad. All-in-all we/me are generally healthy, never get the flu, colds, etc. and I doubt we will have any CV symptoms. As a night owl, 24hr type store closures (at 11pm for example) are an inconvenience to me. Plenty of TP, food and PT. I asked a worker at WM if they had any PT and he went in back and got me a 6-pack. Not the cheapies, either. I usually hang them up to dry anyway, then use them for increasingly dirty chores until tossing them.

    I work from home and work from my shop about 10min away with no real human contact at either. All my vendors are open and business is good, I think I've had one cancellation so far. I tried buying a 20pk of N95 face masks about a month ago and was alarmed that the Lowe's had been ordered to send them all to the gov't! :mad: I actually use the masks for their intended purpose. We are not "out" yet, but in a month or two we will be...

    I have some deadbeat tenants that just got a reprieve from the FL Gubna. (ie: no evictions for 90days) :mad: I have a real problem with being essentially FORCED to provide housing for people not related to me and not doing work on my property as agreed to. Then the courts are going to be PACKED with cases and I'm sure evictions aren't going to be very high on the list. "Apply for forebearance" or whatever they are telling landlords to do for relief but the problem is 1) the land does not have a mortgage 2) not all banks are participating in such programs and 3) who has the time to be on hold for hours? :mad: (rant over)

    PS: I have a pinhead wife that watches the numbnutnews such as CNN or MSLSD. This of course makes her feel like an expert on the subject even though I do not initiate conversation or ask for her opinions... Like they say: it is cheaper to keep her... :(

    mask.jpg
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  10. hombre243

    hombre243 .30-06

    Messages:
    1,300
    Havin a fit posting these but this is how I am dealing with the "home" time. I think I am getting used to it.

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 10, 2020
  11. nitesite

    nitesite Average Guy Moderator "Philanthropist"

    Messages:
    6,234
    We are actually fairly comfortable with staying "at home" for the duration. Somehow,, and without forethought or reason, I as a cooking guy had managed to attain a lot of pantry and frozen items which could last us probably a couple months if it came to that. We even have over a month worth of fresh drinking water, and a generator, and gasoline and propane and bags of charcoal and cooking wood. We have laundry baskets under the eaves to catch rainwater for toilet flushing if the water shuts down for a while. Fresh eggs every day from our Khaki Campbells. We even have plenty of TP and paper towels.

    All without ever feeling like I was "prepping" for something, and nothing close to this ever entered my mind.

    I don't think I will change my buying habits after this passes. Except maybe for medicine stores.
  12. nitesite

    nitesite Average Guy Moderator "Philanthropist"

    Messages:
    6,234
    I like your way of passing the time! Good on you Sir!!!!!!
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  13. hombre243

    hombre243 .30-06

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    1,300
    Is that preppin by accident? If someone else helped buy and stock up, that would be preppin by proxy...I think. Dontcha just love it when a non-plan comes together?
  14. AngryWaffle

    AngryWaffle .22LR Supporter Elite Member

    Messages:
    18
    I'm just tightening up on the hygiene/social distancing. Bought some extra ammo just in case it gets expensive or any harder to find.
  15. John A.

    John A. Unconstitutional laws are not laws. Staff Member Administrator Global Moderator

    Messages:
    16,076
    My wife rocks. She's been couponing for nearly 2 years and has a ton of soap, laundry detergent, shampoos, cleaning supplies and toilet paper and paper towels and such already bought up and put back in the basement. A lot of it was bought for next to nothing, especially with some of the major sales come along. She would routinely get 48 packs of toilet paper for $8 a box and shampoo for $1.30 a big bottle and it's all name brand stuff too. Those are just a few examples, but I have the biggest 48 oz soft soap refill bottles that they make that has $1 clearance stickers on them back from 2013 just because they were bought at the after Christmas seasonal sales because it smells like gingerbread cookies or whatever scent they used for the Holidays. It's not like any of that stuff spoils. She is really good at stuff like that. I'm very fortunate and blessed to have her.

    I went through a lot of our canned foods early on with this stuff and I'm going to embarrassingly admit that I had to throw out more than I would have liked because I didn't want to try to eat it being as old as some of it was. A good thing though, I started buying more canned food and stuff probably back in January and had the reserve food stocked back mostly before anyone started panicking. I guess you could call us preppers but it was like writing on the wall. It was very common for our families to put food and other necessary things back for hard times. So, it is surely paying off for us now.

    We have several different water filters in case we need them. But we've been buying bottled water since we lived here because we don't like how this city water tastes so we're good on water too.

    With as cheap as gas is at the moment, I really need to buy more. Not just for power outages to keep the freezer cold but just because it's low right now with russia and the towel heads fueding over how low they want to sell it which I know is hurting American producers but all that is out of my hands and control so I'm going to make the best of it as I can, and while I can.

    We got the garden plowed up and are waiting for about 2-3 more weeks to get past most of these little (blackberry and sarvis) winters to get some seeds in the ground. I haven't worked on a garden in a few years but I'm kinda afraid not to get some in the ground if things continue to worsen, I'll be glad that I did.

    About the main thing that we're going to the grocery store for is milk, pop, and junk food runs.

    I'll be honest, like a lot of folks out there, this whole thing has been surreal. The world economies are in the dirt. It's like a lot of what the book of Revelations warns in the Bible. If you haven't read it in a while, a lot of what's going on is unprecedented and spookingly accurate.
  16. Bobster

    Bobster .30-06 Supporter

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    2,667
    Two words for today: "Herd Immunity"--what Sweden is practicing. LINK What say you Felly? :) (and any other Swedes...) ;)
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  17. fellmann

    fellmann Esoteric Supporter Premier Member

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    1,165
    I dont think we are practicing herd immunity. :) Feels like the interview is taking stuff out of context. Mr Tegnell have taking a lot of fire in the media for even mentioning "herd immunity". I have also heard a lot of nonsense from the Whitehouse. We have a lot of individual responsibility, which is the key, atm. Shutting some things but not everything down, trying work as a team and taking the hygienic guidlines and social distancing seriously. Those who ignore the guidlines for not spreading the disease are dissed. Stockholm is the WORST place regarding arrogant, ignorant people and the number of covid-19 cases. People are angy at their behavior, not wanting them at the skiresorts etc. at easter, telling them to f**k off. As a whole, we are doing ok, considering the circumstances. 181 cases and 5 deaths in my county. Not a lot of people outside here. Most are spending the easter at home.
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2020
  18. cmcdonald

    cmcdonald Forum Moderator Staff Member Moderator Supporter "Philanthropist"

    Messages:
    1,713
    @fellmann any idea of the testing methods they are employing in your country? We know our numbers here in Canada are much lower than the actual number of cases, just due to the testing criteria. They are mainly focusing on testing healthcare workers, seniors who are showing symptoms, or are in care homes with an outbreak and people who are symptomatic after traveling. Then those who present at the hospital with symptoms and are sick enough to require hospitalization. Most are not tested and are told to go home and isolate for 14 days. After that it's transmission/contact tracing and testing anyone they think is at risk. My guess is the numbers could easily be double the known amounts. Except for the deaths.....unless they're doing what China did and just mis-classified the cause of death of many to skew the numbers.
    Canadian Totals as of today:

    Confirmed
    23,318
    Recovered
    6,458
    Deaths
    653
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  19. CaddmannQ

    CaddmannQ 12g Supporter

    Messages:
    9,572
    California has 4x the people of Sweden but we have 10x the cases of Covid-19.
    Fortunately, they are mostly on the coast 100+ miles from me.

    But in the central cal area we have as many cases as Sweden and a few more.
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  20. carbinemike

    carbinemike Global Moderator Staff Member Global Moderator "Philanthropist"

    Messages:
    6,079
    I have had the smoker fired up several time already. So far I have made a couple pounds of beef jerky, smoked fresh trout we caught, some bacon jalapeno snacks and pork ribs, We had some nice burgers from a chuck roast that I ground up myself. My son cooked us a dinner on the coals of a campfire one night. I have tried to make one good, larger meal per day. We had a Christmas dinner with an extra turkey. Special breakfast has been some creamed chipped beef and also sausage gravy over home made biscuits. I have home brewed twice too.

    I have really tried to make due and not waste anything. Old banana's became a cake etc. We have the garden going again and have heirloom seeds for when it gets warmer. The peach and cherry trees are flowering and the apple trees will soon. I picked up a few walnut trees to plant for the future that are supposed to be blight resistant. We have several healing herbs we grow with the elderberry bush really produced well last year. My daughter loves to prepare and can a lot of what we grow. She also makes butter and bread. We are rural with Amish around here so eggs and milk are not an issue.

    For home defense (which has not been an issue around here through this) I have a ground floor bedroom with most of my guns. My son has had access to a 12 gauge brand R with forgrip flashlight for some time. He recently turned 18 and has an AR-15 under his bed too. We have discussed different scenarios and how we would handle them. Most scenarios include him staying upstairs in a defensive position that can protect both he and my daughter.

    Areas where we are lacking: should probably have more dried goods like rice and beans. Cleaning supplies were not stocked well enough. I will keep more PPE gloves etc on hand in the future. We had an above ground pool which used to be my source for toilet flushing water. We have drinking water but the pool died and is gone. We could use a better water source.

    The virus is around here. We have had several grocery stores close after employees were diagnosed with it. The same with some convenience stores. My sister in law had to be tested. She works at an old folks home where one of her patients had it. She was negative. Some of the food I prepared I dropped off portions for my parents who are in their 80's. My brother is living there and keeping them going. It's hard for him as my dad is still very active. One trip I dropped off some wild flowers for mom and a quart of 13% alcohol hard cider for my dad. Mom gave me hell for it..."he doesn't need that!"

    Be safe and be well Mossberg Owners

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